Unresponsive aircraft seven-seat TBM900 jet, flight #N900KN crashed in Jamica

Photo of ceremony when DAHER-SOCATA delivered the first three production versions of the newest member in its TBM family of very fast, single-engine turboprop business aircraft: the TBM 900 on March 24, 2014  in USA.
Photo of ceremony when DAHER-SOCATA delivered the first three production versions of the newest member in its TBM family of very fast, single-engine turboprop business aircraft: the TBM 900 on March 24, 2014 in USA.

 

Larry Glazer and his wife Jane
LarryGlazer and his wife, Jane are reportedly dead in this crash.

Monitoring Desk: The Unresponsive aircraft seven-seat Socata TBM-900 jet, flight number N900KN crashed in Jamica from fuel exhaustion. AIN reports that Larry Glazer–CEO of Rochester, N.Y.-based commercial/industrial real-estate developer Buckingham Properties and president of the TBM Owners and Pilots Association–was handed the keys to TBM 900 S/N 1003, registered as N900KN, during the U.S. debut of the upgraded turboprop single late last week in Polk City, Fla. LarryGlazer and his wife, Jane are reportedly dead in this crash.

 

DAHER-SOCATA delivered the first three production versions of the newest member in its TBM family of very fast, single-engine turboprop business aircraft: the TBM 900 on March 24, 2014  in USA.

 

Early reports

Two American fighter jets and a Cuban military aircraft were sent to intercept seven-seat Socata TBM-900 jet, flight #N900KN  that was unresponsive aircraft in the sky. According to information aircraft, en route from Rochester, New York to Naples, Florida, after the plane failed to respond to communications. CNN reported that three people, including the pilot, were on the plane.

The aircraft was a seven-seat Socata TBM-700 jet, flight number N900KN.

By 1:30 pm, CNN reported, at least one Cuban military jet had been scrambled to trail the plane as well. The US Coast Guard had been communicating with authorities in Cuba as the plane prepared to enter that nation’s airspace, and the jet finally did so around five hours into the flight.

The US jets have reportedly refueled and are waiting for the unresponsive plane to exit Cuban airspace, although the craft in believed to be short on fuel itself. According to live tracking provided by FlightAware.com, the jet was just south of Cuba heading towards Jamaica at 2:00 pm, but could run out of fuel at any moment over the Caribean.